5 Natural Remedies for Morning Sickness

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Nausea and morning sickness during pregnancy are some of the most common symptoms that women experience. You’re not alone if morning sickness has you feeling a little under the weather. In fact, about 70% of pregnant women get morning sickness.

This article discusses five natural remedies for morning sickness during pregnancy that have been shown to be safe and effective.

Ginger

Firstly, ginger has been used in a medicinal capacity for many many years. It is used to ease morning sickness, motion sickness, as well as cancer-related nausea. Research suggests that ginger may help settle an upset stomach in pregnant women experiencing morning sickness.

Ginger comes in many forms such as:

  • Ginger tea
  • Ginger chews
  • Ginger lollipops
  • Ginger ale
  • Natural form
  • Supplements

Moms to be can take ginger supplements three to four times daily after consulting with their health care provider.

Eat Smaller and More Frequent Meals

Eating smaller, more frequent meals can help reduce morning sickness. It’s important to make sure that you’re not eating too little during the day and making up for it by overeating in one sitting later on. This will only further upset your stomach allowing your blood sugar to drop.

Eat slowly and mindfully, adding nutrients into the body. Although you may feel the temptation to skip meals because of the nausea, remember you are eating for two. Try eating foods without additives and that are easy on the stomach

Some ideas are:

  • Fruit
  • cooked sweet potatoes
  • smoothies
  • rice
  • non-processed carbohydrates

Peppermint Aromatherapy

Another natural remedy for morning sickness is peppermint aromatherapy. Studies show that it can help reduce not only nausea during pregnancy but in women who have just given birth via C-section as well. Moreover, peppermint oil is thought to help ease morning sickness by stimulating the digestive system and calming the nervous system.

Try dotting your peppermint essential oil onto these parts of the body:

  • Wrist
  • Temples
  • Under the nose
  • Neck
  • Back
  • Upper chest area

Vitamin B6 & Magnesium

Additionally, some healthy vitamins and supplements that are known to help with morning sickness and nausea are vitamin B6 and magnesium. Vitamin B, as well as magnesium, can be found in many prenatal vitamins or supplements.

Eating more protein-rich foods like:

  • Meats
  • Fish
  • Poultry
  • Avocado
  • Bananas
  • Pistachios
  • Sunflower seeds

Magnesium can be taken in supplements, topically with magnesium spray, as well as mixed in a bath with Epsom salts.

Avoid Strong Smells

Lastly, and maybe a bit obvious, is avoiding strong smells that may trigger nausea. Many pregnant women experience heightened senses like smell, which you can blame on your pregnancy hormones. Due to our estrogen levels being so high, any small scent that passes our nostrils can seem like an all-out assault on our noses.

Try avoiding these items:

  • Cigarette smoke
  • Perfumes
  • Chemicals in cleaners 
  • Strongly scented foods
  • Candles

If You are Experiencing Morning Sickness

If morning sickness and nausea are a problem for you during pregnancy, there are many natural and at-home remedies that can help. Many women experience it and in most cases, it goes away by week 14.  However, if the nausea is severe, you may want to consult with your health care provider.

If you are looking for or have any questions about pregnancy, birth, and family planning contact Midwife 360. We not only provide holistic gynecology but pregnancy services, which include home birth and water birth to women throughout South Florida. We are here to assist you as well as educate you every step of the way.

Postpartum Hair Loss

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Hair loss is a natural process that many people experience. However, hair loss or thinning during postpartum can be especially challenging, since it’s often accompanied by breakage, and scalp irritation. The good news is that hair grows back.

The hair loss that many new moms experience a few months after having a baby is called postpartum hair shedding. This hair loss happens because the levels of estrogen and progesterone in your body are decreasing or going back to normal after spiking during pregnancy. This often causes your hair to grow slower and less full. It’s not true hair loss during postpartum because it will grow back. Dermatologists refer to hair loss as excessive hair shedding.

What Causes Postpartum Hair Loss

The hair loss most often associated with pregnancy is due to the hormonal changes during and after pregnancy. During pregnancy women notice their hair growing thicker and looking more full. The hormones during pregnancy keep your hair from falling out. However, following pregnancy, these hormones drop and the hair begins falling out and thinning.

The condition, which is also referred to as postpartum alopecia, is relatively common, affecting between 40-50% of women in the months following childbirth.

How Hormones Affect Hair Loss/ Growth

Estrogen is the leading hormone that affects hair growth during pregnancy, postpartum, as well as in menopausal women. Many women during their pregnancy experience fuller and thicker hair growth. This is due to the increase of the estrogen hormone in the body. Thus, producing more hair follicles during the growing phase of the growth cycle.

However, following the birth of your new baby, your estrogen levels drop and return back to the level pre-pregnancy. This causes the new follicles to enter the resting phase of the growth cycle. During this phase, the hair grows slower and produces fewer strands, and begins to shed. Postpartum Thyroiditis can also result in an imbalance of thyroid hormones, which can also affect hair growth.

How Long Does Postpartum Hair Loss Last?

In most cases hair loss after postpartum is temporary. Hair will start to grow back within a few months. Excessive hair loss usually starts eight weeks after giving birth and will last for six to 12 months. If your hair does not begin growing back by your baby’s first birthday, you may consult with your dermatologist or healthcare provider. Month 15 is the lucky number where most women feel their hair is back to normal.

How To Help with Hair Loss/ Growth

There are natural and home remedies that a new mom can implement into her daily routine to help with postpartum hair loss. Some of these can include all-natural shampoos that are specifically for hair loss and helping with new growth. Fenugreek seeds are also helpful when soaked and used as a scalp/hair mask. This herb is also helpful for the production of breast milk.

Adding “hair-healthy” foods into your diet can also promote healthier and quicker hair growth. Including things like:

  • Leafy greens
  • Eggs
  • Healthy fats (avocado, nuts)
  • Vitamin B12
  • Berries
  • Sweet Potatoes

Before the consumption or use of any of these listed always check with your healthcare provider to ensure the safety of you and your baby.

If You Have Any Other Questions

For all pregnancy and women’s care needs contact the professionals at Midwife360. We provide holistic gynecology and pregnancy services, including home birth and water birth to women throughout South Florida. We support and educate women every step of the way through family planning, healthcare options, and birthing. Contact us today to schedule an appointment or speak with one of our midwives.

What If I Have Group B Strep (GBS) While Pregnant or in Labor?

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Group B Streptococcus or GBS is a common bacterial organism found in about a third of people. This bacterial organism is most commonly found in the intestinal tract. However, it can move through the body and colonize the rectum, bladder, and vaginal tract of women. Colonize meaning the bacteria is present, but not infecting the tissues or causing symptoms.

GBS has the ability to give anyone an infection. However most adults, due to having a healthy microbiome, will keep any harmful bacteria in check and will not cause an illness. 

What’s The Big Deal About GBS During Pregnancy?

Decades ago, GBS was the leading cause of infection in newborns and infants. This infection can have devastating effects on a fragile new life, including pneumonia, sepsis, and meningitis. It can cause bladder, uterine, or urinary tract infections. It can also cause miscarriage and increase the risk of premature labor and rupture of membranes. GBS can also cause stillbirth. 

Newborns can get GBS infection in utero, during birth, or even from healthcare workers and family members. Handwashing is important for anyone who will be holding a newborn baby to prevent spreading GBS or other harmful infections.

The Risks to Baby  

When a baby is exposed to GBS in labor or during birth, he or she has a 50% chance of becoming colonized with GBS. Nevertheless, a small percentage of babies exposed to GBS will become infected and sick.  

Most often, babies become infected through exposure in the birth canal during birth. As well as from bacteria migrating upwards once the water has broken. 

Testing For GBS

As of 2020, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) now states that the best time to test for GBS presence is between the 36th and 37th weeks of pregnancy.  This test is done by swabbing the vagina and rectum to determine if GBS is present.

There is also an FDA-approved rapid test that can diagnose GBS in roughly an hour. 

GBS Treatment

To prevent GBS infection in babies antibiotics are used, however, there are associated risks. Many of us know antibiotics are detrimental to our microbiome. Babies receive significant benefits from their mom’s microbiome when birthed vaginally. In turn, affecting the baby’s entire life in a positive way. 

In order to mitigate infections overall, if a laboring mom has prolonged rupture of membranes, a fever, or other infection risk factors, antibiotics will be prescribed even if GBS testing was negative. The treatment is typically IV antibiotics for a minimum of 4 hours before the baby is born. Of course, the time of birth is hard to predict, so typically the hospital will start the antibiotics upon arrival to the hospital.

Treatment has been very effective for lowering the number of newborns who develop GBS infections. There is some controversy concerning antibiotic use during labor and how this can affect babies. 

Is Treatment Harmful For Baby?

Some studies suggest that antibiotics during pregnancy and delivery can decrease the presence of beneficial bacteria in a newborn. Breastfeeding and probiotics can help to boost a newborn’s microbiome. 

Antibiotics can cause problems for mom, including yeast infections or nipple infections. This can complicate and disrupt breastfeeding. Sometimes newborns can develop thrush as well. Allergic reactions are rare, as long as your healthcare provider is aware of any allergies. 

Taking a probiotic during pregnancy and after birth can help to prevent thrush or yeast infections.

Can I Reduce My Chance of Testing Positive for GBS?

Healthy vaginal and gut flora can prevent infection, which could affect the presence of GBS. 

Whether or not it will decrease your risk of GBS, there are other benefits to a healthy microbiome. Mitigating the risk of miscarriage, preterm labor, vaginal and bladder infections during labor, are all benefits. 

Steps to boost your microbiome include:

  • Stay away from processed sugar and junk food
  • Implement 8 servings of leafy greens, fruits, and vegetables into your diet
  • Take prenatal vitamins (zinc, vitamin D, vitamin A, vitamin C)
  • Eat more Lacto-fermented foods (example: sauerkraut, yogurt, cucumber, sourdough bread)
  • Reduce stress
  • Use oral and vaginal probiotics throughout pregnancy

Taking all of these into consideration and doing your best to check every box may not change the status if diagnosed, however, it can help to protect against GBS-related prenatal complications. If you are doing all of the necessary steps and have not tested positive before this can help to prevent GBS colonization and the need for antibiotics.  

For More Information, Contact Midwife360

Midwife360 has been providing holistic gynecology and pregnancy services in South Florida since 2014. The founder of Midwife360, P. Fadwah Halaby CNM, takes pride in offering holistic evidence-based practice for all midwife services such as women’s care, family planning, pregnancy care, and birthing. If you have any questions contact Midwife360 today.

A Guide on Postpartum Thyroiditis for New Moms

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Women go through a lot of changes after pregnancy. Some are physical, some are emotional and others cognitive. These changes can be attributed to the pregnancy itself or postpartum depression, which is very common for women in this time period. However, what if these symptoms are actually signs of something more serious like Postpartum Thyroiditis?

Postpartum Thyroiditis is a condition that primarily affects women and it has many symptoms that overlap with pregnancy-related issues such as fatigue, weight loss struggles, hair loss, anxiety, and trouble sleeping. This article will explore all you need to know when you’re expecting.

Know the Symptoms of Postpartum Thyroiditis

It is extremely common for women, especially new mothers, to experience postpartum depression following the birth of their baby. Some of the symptoms are mood swings, withdrawal, loss of appetite, insomnia, and fatigue. Oftentimes, mothers feel extremely depressed as a result of the excess weight they may have gained during their pregnancy.

On the other hand, these symptoms are very similar to what one may feel if one is experiencing postpartum thyroiditis. Some of the common symptoms of both postpartum depression and signs of postpartum thyroiditis are; weight gain, depression, lethargy, muscle weakness, and trouble sleeping. Although it is uncommon for many women to develop postpartum thyroiditis, it can happen and be missed. Due to the similarities in symptoms, many women can have the misconception that they are only experiencing postpartum depression when something much more severe is occurring.

Can It be Detected

Postpartum thyroiditis is a condition that impacts postpartum women. This can occur after the birth of your child and most commonly arises in the first trimester or early second trimester. If you test positive with this antibody during early pregnancy, there is a 40% to 60% higher risk of developing postpartum thyroiditis. Thus, more reason to get checked by your healthcare provider early on.

Types of Postpartum Thyroiditis

It is important for mothers to be aware that they may be experiencing one of the two types of thyroiditis. These being:

  • Hyperthyroidism
  • Hypothyroidism

Knowing and being aware of symptoms of both types is important to be aware of during your term. Although it is easy to miss diagnose these symptoms as something less severe, it is important to report all of them to your healthcare provider.

Hyperthyroidism

This type of postpartum thyroiditis refers to an overactive thyroid. This means the thyroid gland is producing too much thyroid hormone. Thus,  causing the body’s metabolism to speed up, in turn, speeding up other parts of the body.

The symptoms of hyperthyroidism include:

  • Nervousness/ anxiety
  • Spead up heartbeat/ palpitations
  • Weight loss
  • excessive sweating/ heat flashes
  • Increased appetite
  • Insomnia
  • Fatigue
  • Frequent or loose stools

Hypothyroidism

Exactly opposite of hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism is when the gland is deficient in thyroid hormones. When an expecting mother has this type of postpartum thyroiditis, the body functions a lot slower.

The symptoms of hypothyroidism include:

  • Depression
  • Extreme fatigue
  • Decreased milk volume
  • Muscle weakness
  • Constimaption
  • Dry or brittle hair/ nails
  • Hair loss
  • High cholesterol
  • Always cold
  • Weight gain

When mothers experience either type of postpartum thyroiditis it can feel as if they aren’t able to fully enjoy their new baby. The symptoms are hard to overcome making everything feel stagnant.

Prevention

One form of therapy that has worked to help prevent postpartum thyroiditis in women who have high antibodies during pregnancy is giving selenium. Selenium is an essential trace mineral that helps to support many bodily processes. When taken during pregnancy, selenium acts as an anti-inflammatory, helping to reduce the chances of developing postpartum thyroiditis. 

Other helpful prevention ideas can include changing your diet to a more anti-inflammatory diet. Reducing or stopping gluten intake can help reduce inflammation. Choosing BPA-free, phthalate-free, and paraben-free also helps avoid toxins that can be a factor in causing thyroid issues.

More Questions?

If you are looking for more information about thyroid issues and the threats of postpartum thyroiditis, talk to your healthcare provider or give us a call at Midwife360. We are a holistic evidence-based practice for women’s care, family planning, pregnancy care, and birthing throughout South Florida. Our practice is designed to meet the individual needs of each woman and family we care for. We believe women should be informed and educated about their healthcare options and empowered to make their own choices.

Natural Remedies for Pregnancy Heartburn

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Pregnancy heartburn is a common ailment that many moms experience. At MidWife360 in South Florida, we hear these complaints all the time. 

Heartburn or acid reflux is uncomfortable, but generally not a danger to mom or baby. Many people don’t experience heartburn until they are pregnant or later on in life. You may be wondering, how do I know if I have heartburn?

What is Pregnancy Heartburn?

Acid reflux is when stomach acid creeps up towards the esophagus. This is common in pregnancy due to hormonal changes, and the pressure of the baby on the stomach. Unfortunately, it tends to worsen as the pregnancy progresses. A burning sensation in the throat is the most common symptom, but there are other symptoms associated with acid reflux. 

Other Symptoms Include:

  • Nausea or upset stomach
  • Burning sensation in the chest and throat
  • Acid taste
  • Gnawing feeling in the stomach
  • Cough
  • Raspy voice

Is Testing Needed?

Labs and testing are not usually needed due to how frequent and apparent it is to diagnose heartburn. That being said, if you are pregnant and experiencing chest pain, that needs to be addressed by a medical professional. Be sure to let your doctor or midwife know right away. 

The most common medications prescribed to pregnant women with heartburn are antacids, proton pump inhibitors and histamine blockers. These medications are usually safe and effective for brief periods of time. However, because heartburn can persist for larger time frames, some women tend to try natural remedies in order to avoid long term use of medications. As well as any side effects. 

5  Natural Remedies for Pregnancy Heartburn

The medical professionals at MidWife360 know that heartburn can often be managed safely with herbs and supplements. 

1. Raw Almonds

Check the packaging and be sure the almonds are raw, not roasted. Try consuming 8 to 10 plain raw almonds on a daily basis. The almonds can help keep the stomach acid where it belongs by toning the gateway between the stomach and the esophagus.  

2. Melatonin

Melatonin is a common natural sleep aid. Fortunately, it can also help to keep heartburn at bay. Similar to almonds, it helps tone the muscular gateway between the stomach and esophagus. Try taking 0.3 milligrams before going to bed each night. 

3. Slippery Elm

Slippery elm is an herb that is safe to consume during pregnancy. It gets its name from becoming slippery when wet. This gentle herb aids heartburn by coating the lining of the esophagus and stomach. This will help protect the delicate tissues. 

Look for slippery elm lozenges at a natural foods store. We recommend taking 2 to 4 lozenges when needed or try taking them before going to bed. 

4. Marshmallow Root

Marshmallow Root is an herb that is safe during pregnancy, and like slippery elm,  also becomes slippery when wet. This herb works in the same way as slippery elm, by creating a coating on the lining of the esophagus and stomach. Thus, protecting those delicate tissues from acid and allowing them to heal. 

Marshmallow root can be consumed in tea, twice daily. Put one tablespoon in one cup of boiling water and steep for half an hour, and then enjoy. Alternatively, you can take two pills of the marshmallow root 2 to 4 times a day. 

5. Plain Crackers

Acidic foods or spicy foods tend to trigger heartburn and should be avoided. If you do experience heartburn following a meal or snack you ate, try eating plain or saltine crackers. The crackers are able to absorb the excess of acid in the stomach. Thus, helping to stop the signs and symptoms of heartburn.

Refrain from Heartburn Triggers

  • Foods that can trigger heartburn: soda, coffee, spicy food, tomatoes
  • Try not to eat right before bed
  • Stay away from consuming mint, peppermint, spearmint. 
  • Don’t lay completely flat in bed, try propping yourself up with pillows. 

If you have any other questions or concerns about heartburn or acid reflux, the midwives at MidWife360 in West Palm Beach, Florida are here to help. 

We provide holistic gynecology and pregnancy services, including home birth and water birth to women throughout South Florida. Our mission is to awaken, nurture, and support freedom, grace, and integrity for family planning, childbirth and women’s care. We hope you will have an enjoyable pregnancy with these tips!

Medicinal Herbs for a Safe Holistic Pregnancy

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The midwives at MidWife360 in West Palm Beach, Florida have gathered our collective knowledge and experience in order to provide you with an introduction to using herbs during pregnancy.

Initial Thoughts on Modern Medicine

As a certified nurse midwife, I’m forever grateful for the medical advancements in obstetric gynecology. Thanks to these technologies, the outcomes of high-risk pregnancies and complications in birth and pregnancy have vastly improved. This has saved countless lives. 

There are two sides to every coin, and unfortunately some of these advancements have been, and are continuing to be overused. For example, about 1 in 3 women in the United States gives birth via cesarean delivery. Many experts agree that this is far too high.

Furthermore, the use of pharmaceutical medications for pregnant women is also excessive, and carries risks like cesarean deliver. Many medications that were thought to be safe, like Tylenol and common yeast infection medications, have been found to carry significant risks. 

Are Herbs Safe?

In comparison, the usage of herbs during pregnancy appears mild and safe. Just like anything, it’s important to be extra informed and safe when using any herbs or medications during pregnancy. The desire toward more natural and holistic solutions has been growing. At MidWife360 we aim to incorporate more gentle and herbal solutions whenever necessary. 

Using herbs for common pregnancy symptoms and discomforts is very commonplace. Using herbs for medicinal purposes dates back to the ancient Egyptians.  In all fairness, scientific research and formal evaluations of many herbs are not available or priority. 

However, pharmaceutical medications are often in the same boat. In the U.S. almost 90% of all pregnant women will be prescribed some kind of medication during their pregnancy. 

As far as herbal and botanical medicine, most of what we know is based on historical, empirical, and observational evidence. There have been some formal and animal studies. Generally, most herbs have no evidence of harm and natural remedies may be safer than typical prescription medications. 

Adverse effects are few and far between, and when they do happen it is often because the individual is uninformed. Some herbs can be toxic or are only appropriate in small doses. Keep in mind, many experts have different opinions on the use of herbs. Just because something does not have proven adverse effects, does not mean it is proven to be safe. 

Some symptoms or illnesses should always call for prompt medical care, and should not be treated at home with herbs. They are as follows:

  • Continuous bleeding
  • Initial herpes blisters or outbreak 
  • Serious pelvic or abdominal pain
  • Continuous serious mid-back pain
  • Hand and face edema
  • Membranes rupture before 37 weeks
  • Regular contractions before 37 weeks
  • Serious headaches, blurred vision, and epigastric pain
  • Fetal movement stopping

Commonly Used Herbs in Pregnancy

There are different lists and opinions among medical professionals. Some of the most common herbs used for pregnancy concerns are: raspberry leaf, evening primrose, garlic, aloe, chamomile, peppermint, ginger, echinacea, St. John’s wort, fennel, wild yam, meadowsweet, pumpkin seeds and ginseng. 

Common ailments pregnant women seek complimentary or natural remedies for are anxiety, nausea or vomiting, urinary tract problems, or lower GI problems. 

This chart is a helpful tool but always work with your doctor or midwife to be safe. The midwives at MidWife360 are well-versed in the safety and use of herbal remedies. 

Herbs for Birth Preparation

Red raspberry leaf tea and red dates are common for birth preparation. Two cups of red raspberry tea daily is safe in pregnancy. 

Additionally, studies have shown the tea causes labor to be more comfortable and reduces need for medical interventions. There are even benefits for babies! Newborns are less likely to require resuscitation. 

Red dates consumed regularly in the last trimester are safe, and also cause labor to be more comfortable. 

The good news is, both the tea and dates are delicious. Making it easy to incorporate into your daily diet and routine. This vegan red raspberry tea latte is a great way to enjoy the tea. Snacking on dates by themselves or adding a few in a smoothie is an easy way to eat them. 

Final Thoughts

Herbal remedies can offer significant relief and benefits for some common discomforts and symptoms of pregnancy and childbirth. Just like anything during pregnancy, use herbs with caution and under the supervision of your midwife or doctor. 

At MidWife360 in West Palm Beach, Florida we offer herbal recommendations for our patients when needed. Though nothing can replace a healthy diet, exercise, positive mindset, and support system. 

A Complete Guide About Shoulder Dystocia

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What is Shoulder Dystocia?

Shoulder Dystocia is a birth complication that happens during vaginal delivery. When this occurs, one or both of the baby’s shoulders get stuck inside the mother’s pelvis during labor. This causes a stall in the delivery process, which can be life threatening. In most cases, babies born with this complication are delivered safely. However, it can cause problems for both the baby and mother. 

Shoulder dystocia happens in 0.2 to 3 percent of pregnancies, and sadly, is unpredictable and unpreventable. When complications happen during labor, doctors turn to urgent cesarean delivery or surgery to avoid further issues. Although this may work in most cases, urgent cesarean delivery or surgery cannot correct this condition. 

Continue reading below for answers to all questions regarding this topic. 

Frequently Asked Questions:

What Does Shoulder Dystocia Look Like?

When Shoulder Dystocia occurs, the fetal head is delivered but the shoulders are not seen and are not being delivered with normal maneuvers. In other words, this delay in labor causes the baby to be trapped mid delivery. When this is happening, your midwife or provider tries to move your body and baby into better positions to continue natural delivery. 

The shoulder of the baby normally gets stuck behind the mothers pubic bone or sacrum. During this delay, the baby cannot breathe and the umbilical cord may be squeezed or wrapped around the baby’s neck. It is dire that everyone stays calm but acts quickly and efficiently to prevent further complications. The midwife will ask the mother to cease pushing so she can reposition her and the baby as needed.       

Why Does This Happen?

Shoulder Dystocia can occur during any vaginal birth, and without warning. Some of the most common causes for this are that the baby is too big, the baby is in the wrong position or the mother being in a restricting position. Oftentimes, your midwife or provider will change the mothers position to help free the shoulders from the pelvic area. 

It is nearly impossible to predict the risk factors of whether or not your baby will have this complication, but there are some things that can make it more likely. This includes:

  • Shoulder Dystocia occurred during previous pregnancies
  • Fetal Macrosomia (having a larger baby)
  • Having twins or multiple babies
  • Mother is overweight
  • Mother has diabetes
  • Labor induced 

Although these factors may increase the risk of a baby being born with Shoulder Dystocia, it is not clear why some pregnancies experience this complication while others do not. One statistic states that women with a history of having a delivery with Shoulder Dystocia are 10- 20 percent more likely to have a recurrence. 

What are the Complications?

Although most mothers and babies may not experience any further issues regarding this complication, it can bring about further issues. When delivering a baby with Shoulder Dystocia, a midwife or provider may have to break the baby’s collarbone to help with removal of the shoulders. This is a last resort, but may be necessary. This is only one risk that may come from this condition. 

Further risk for the baby may include:

  • Fractured collarbone (clavicle) or arm
  • Fetal brachial plexus injury
  • Lack of oxygen to the body
  • Brain injury due to lack of oxygen (this is rare)
  • Loss of baby (this is rare)

Further risk for the mother may include:

  • Maternal hemorrhage/ postpartum hemorrhage
  • Repairs for episiotomy or tearing during delivery 
  • Uterine rupture

Can You Prevent or Treat Shoulder Dystocia?

Like we touched on above, Shoulder Dystocia is extremely unpredictable and there is very little prevention. Being mindful of potential risk factors like diabetes and watching your weight during pregnancy are all things to help lower your chance of complications during labor. At Midwife360, we recommend our mothers to give birth lying on their side or on all fours to help natural movement of the delivery process. This will help prevent complications like Shoulder Dystocia. 

It is important to inform the expecting mother about the complications and risks of Shoulder Dystocia.  As well as reassure her that, as a midwife, we are trained thoroughly on how to deal with these complications in the safest and most efficient way for the safety of you and your unborn child.  

If You Have Further Questions

If you have any questions unanswered or need more information contact us at Midwife360. At Midwife360 we provide holistic gynecology and pregnancy services, including home and water birth to women throughout South Florida. Our mission and practice is designed to meet the individual needs of each woman and expecting family we care for. We believe women should be informed and educated about their healthcare options for routine care, family planning and birthing.

A Complete Guide to Miscarriage at Home

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Is Miscarriage Normal?

Pregnancy and miscarriage carry a ton of emotions, and one may feel devastated or uneasy when going through a natural miscarriage. Although this is can be an extremely tough time mentally and physically, it may be comforting to know you’re not alone. 

An estimated 10%-20% of women who know they are pregnant will have a miscarriage. Also, most women (87%) who do experience a miscarriage will have a successful pregnancy and birth following that miscarriage. 

Maybe your pregnancy test was positive after missing your period, or some women have that gut feeling without having missed a period yet. Feeling excited, scared, happy, nervous, or just numb are all in the normal range of emotions when you first discover a pregnancy. Or maybe you’ve been trying for months to get pregnant and now you finally are. 

Just when you feel like you are beginning to get comfortable with your pregnancy, you start to have some spotting, maybe a little red bleeding, and then some light cramping. 

Next Steps

Contacting your health care provider and making them aware of what is going on is important. They may offer to have an ultrasound or blood work done. The bleeding becomes heavier and the cramping gets stronger and you no longer have the pregnancy symptoms you were starting to feel prior. Unfortunately, you are most likely experiencing a miscarriage. 

If your body is already starting to bleed and cramp, this is a sign your body is getting ready to expel the products of conception. Sometimes there’s not an actual fetus present. This means it could be a chemical pregnancy with no fetus, just a gestational sac. 

If there are no complications, you can safely miscarry at home. You may want to have some ibuprofen on hand and a hot water bottle. Soaking in a warm bath can also be very soothing. The worst of it can take about 2 hours with some pretty intense cramping and heavy bleeding. 

When to Seek Help

You would need to seek out medical care if you have pain that you cannot tolerate, or if you begin to hemorrhage. The definition of a hemorrhage is, soaking a maxi pad to where you can wring it out, and doing this for 2 hours. Of course, if the bleeding is much heavier than that or you feel unsafe, don’t wait to get medical help. 

Missed Miscarriage

A ‘missed miscarriage’ is where the fetus stops growing but there’s no signs of bleeding or cramping right away. It’s usually during the first ultrasound that this will be diagnosed. Or if you were following the beta HCG hormone, and it isn’t doubling or rising appropriately in the first 10 weeks, a miscarriage can be diagnosed this way, as well. 

If you do have a missed miscarriage, do not wait before seeing your provider for an intervention. It is dangerous for the pregnancy to sit in your womb for months, as it can cause some dangerous bleeding when the natural miscarriage begins. You will most likely be given several options, depending on the preference of the provider. It is always best to be informed ahead of time, in case your provider does not offer all the common or available options. 

Intervention Options for Missed Miscarriage

  • D&C or Dilation and Curettage

A D&C is a fairly common procedure to eliminate uterine lining and pregnancy contents. This procedure is very safe and complications are rare. Light spotting and cramping is common in the first few days after a D&C. 

  • Medications

Medications like Misoprostol are also an option, which cause your uterus to cramp. This process usually takes about 24 hours to complete. This option is also very safe and complications are rare.  

Miscarriage is Common

Miscarriage is very common, you would have to have 3 in a row before it is considered a medical problem. An option is to see a Maternal Fetal Medicine doctor to have a consult regarding any specific blood tests needed to determine if you have a genetic predisposition to miscarriage. These may include: Anticardiolipin, TSH, Lupus anticoagulant, beta 2 glycoprotein, and maternal karyotype. 

Some providers will recommend taking a baby aspirin every day to reduce the risk of miscarriage. And sometimes they may recommend taking progesterone to help you maintain the pregnancy. These all depend on the results of the blood tests and the actual medical diagnosis that is causing the miscarriages.

Next Cycle and/or Pregnancy After Miscarriage 

You can have your beta HCG levels checked, or simply wait for your next cycle. You should have a period by 4-6 weeks after the miscarriage. If you don’t have your cycle within 4-6 weeks, contact your care provider for further testing or ultrasounds. It is recommended to actively prevent pregnancy for 2 cycles following a miscarriage to lower your risk of having another miscarriage right away.

Holistic Gynecology and Pregnancy Services

If you are looking for holistic gynecology and pregnancy services, including home birth and water birth in South Florida, contact Midwife 360 for all of your questions and needs.

Headaches During Pregnancy

headaches_during_pregnancy

Headaches are one of the most common discomforts during pregnancy, especially during the first and third trimester. As a pregnant woman, our bodies go through so much physical and mental change. During pregnancy, a woman’s body experiences changes in hormone levels and heightened blood volume. These changes can trigger more frequent headaches. Other triggers can also bring on headaches like stress, dehydration, lack of sleep and not having your normal cup of joe each morning.  

Unfortunately, when most will gravitate towards using over the counter headache medication, pregnant women are normally hesitant. If you are experiencing severe or frequent headaches, always consult with your doctor. There are different types of headaches that you may experience during your pregnancy. Continue reading to learn more about these and how you can treat these headaches in the safest way for you and your baby. 

Different Types of Headaches

More times than not, the headaches women may experience during pregnancy are primary headaches, meaning that the pain doesn’t come from another underlying issue. Experiencing these during pregnancy are common and should not bring alarm. Letting your doctor know you are frequently experiencing headache pain is important to find out what can best help relieve your discomfort. 

 The three most common types of headaches experienced during pregnancy are:

  • Tension headaches
  • Migraines
  • Sinus headaches

Tension headaches are the most common type of headache you will experience. This can be brought on by stress, hunger or if you are carrying tension in your neck and shoulders. When suffering from a tension headache, you may experience mild or moderate dull pain behind the eyes on both sides of the head. Oftentimes, tension headaches will go away within an hour or two. 

Migraines are a more intense sensation of pain that throbs, and can be felt on one side of the head and neck. These types of headaches tend to last for hours and sometimes days. Migraines can also bring on other symptoms like blurred vision, light sensitivity, numbness and nausea. 

Lastly, some women can experience sinus headaches during pregnancy. With a sinus headache, women will experience intense pressure around the eyes, cheeks and forehead area. These types of headaches can also trigger a stuffy nose and occur when someone has a sinus infection. Like migraines, these headaches get worse with more movement and light exposure. 

Is Tylenol Safe?

When most people experience headaches or muscle pain, oftentimes, without second thought, they grab a bottle of Tylenol to relieve this pain. Tylenol contains the drug acetaminophen or paracetamol. Most doctors recommend the use of Tylenol rather than other over the counter medications like Ibuprofen and Aspirin. If your doctor recommends the use of Tylenol during your pregnancy to relieve headache pain, it is important to only take the dose recommended. 

Due to the fact that you are now fueling two bodies, many pregnant women choose to take the holistic route. They make healthy changes in their diet and exercise habits to ensure the health of their baby throughout their pregnancy. Oftentimes, women choose to opt out from putting things like Tylenol into their bodies to stay as natural as possible, but what are alternative options to dealing with the pain?

What Are Safe/Holistic Remedies? 

Many people choose to avoid medication if they can, especially women who are pregnant. What happens when a pesky headache comes on and the pain is not bearable? Here are some home remedies that can help relieve headache pain without all the pills. 

  • Lying in a dark room with eyes closed and minimal light
  • Cold compress over eyes and neck
  • Heating pad/ steam to relieve any pain
  • Drinking plenty of water and eating enough protein
  • Getting an ample amount of sleep 
  • Taking a warm bath with Epsom salt
  • Essential oils
  • Drinking tea (without caffeine) 
  • Meditation
  • Pregnancy massages 

These home remedies are known to help relieve headaches whether you are pregnant or not. If your pain becomes more severe or too frequent, consult with your doctor or OBGYN and discuss what the best and healthiest options are. If you are looking for holistic gynecology and pregnancy services, including home birth and water birth in South Florida, visit Midwife 360 for all of your questions and needs.

5 Lactation-Boosting Recipes for Breastfeeding Moms

5_lactation_recipes_for_breastfeeding_moms

Breastfeeding is a magical experience that forms a lasting bond between mother and child. Unfortunately, many new mamas struggle with lactation when it comes to breastfeeding their little ones. The little one you shared your body with for the last 9 months is now in your arms, and as before, you are the source of their life.

It’s okay if the immense love you’re feeling right now is mixed with a bit of uncertainty. Bringing a child into the world is a pretty big deal, but you also may be concerned about whether you can produce the amount of nourishment they’ll need to thrive and grow.

However, this is a common concern that a lot of mothers have. To help you feel more at ease about nursing, we’ve put together some lactation-friendly recipes, foods, and general advice so that you can take your mind off of your milk supply and live in the moment with your precious little gift.

Lactation Boosting Foods (Galactagogues)

Galactagogue is a fancy name for substances that naturally increase breast milk production. Galactagogues come in various foods and herbs, and anyone can easily use them in lactation-boosting recipes. As a matter of fact, you probably already consume them regularly and don’t know it.

Lactation-friendly foods:

– Pumpkin
– Oats or Oatmeal
– Brown rice
– Chickpeas or garbanzo beans
– Lean proteins
– Electrolight rich beverages (such as coconut water)
– Healthy fats like eggs and avocados
– Herbs like turmeric and fenugreek
– Dark green leafy vegetables
– Moringa leaf

Lactation Boosting-Recipes for Breastfeeding Moms:

Lactation-friendly Pumpkin Chai Latte

Usually, when we think of pumpkins, we think of autumn. But you can enjoy this warm, delightful treat and stimulate milk production any time of the year.
lactation_latte_recipe
Directions:

– Bring ½ cup water to a gentle boil in a small saucepan.
– After removing the water from heat, add the teabag.
– Let the tea bag steep for a few minutes, depending on how strong you like your tea.
– Next, add the pumpkin purée, almond milk, vanilla, pumpkin spice blend, and salt to the saucepan.
– Whisk in the cornstarch. Pour the mixture into a blender and blend until the ingredients are creamy. (1-2 minutes)
– After the mixture is blended, pour it back into the saucepan.
– Warm the mixture on low heat to your liking.
– Finally, top with totally optional whipped cream and star of anise or cinnamon stick.

Stimulating Southwest Vegetarian Bake

Think brown rice is bland? Well, this recipe begs to differ. This savory south of the border dish includes more than one lactation boosting ingredient. Plus, the whole family will love it!
lactation_vegetable_bake_recipe
Directions:

– Bring water to a boil, and then add the rice.
– Cover the pot, reduce the heat and simmer, for 35-40 minutes until tender. – Preheat oven to 350°
– Layer beans, corn, tomatoes, cheddar cheese, and rice in a large bowl.
– Then, mix in the salsa, sour cream (optional), and pepper.
– After mixing food, transfer it to a baking dish coated with cooking spray.
– Add in the onion and olives.
– Bake, uncovered, 30 minutes until everything is heated all the way through and the cheese is melted.
– Let stand 10 minutes before serving and enjoy.

Mediterranean Chickpea Salad

This colorful Mediterranean-style salad could give breastfeeding moms the boost in lactation they need while helping them get back to their pre-pregnancy shape!
chickpea_lactation_boosting_salad_recipe
Directions: Toss ingredients together in a bowl and drizzle with vinegarette dressing.
Enjoy!

Spinach Salad with Salmon and Lactation-Boosting Dressing

In reality, dark leafy greens should be a staple in every breastfeeding mom’s diet. However, this recipe takes greens and mixes them nicely with other nutrient-rich powerhouses like salmon and sweet potatoes. Then couples them with a lactation-friendly dressing.
salmon_spinach_salad_breastfeeding_recipe
Directions:

Combine ingredients in a bowl and toss with dressing. Enjoy!

Moringa Leaf Morning Smoothie

This spicy little plant may be lesser known to the masses, but it lacks nothing in the ‘good for you’ department. Moringa leaf is packed with vitamin C, calcium, potassium, iron, amino acids, protein, and antioxidants. Not to mention, it’s a natural galactagogue! You can find it in powder form at your local health food store.
moringa_lactaction_smoothie_recipe
Directions:

Put the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Enjoy!

The Best Defense is a Good Offense

Diet is undeniably the most important part of sustaining your milk supply. But outside of diet, you can do some other proactive things to make sure your milk supply is strong and steady.

– Nurse or pump frequently
– Reduce stress
– Get plenty of rest (sleep when baby sleep if possible)
– Take hot showers

Benefits of Breastfeeding for Baby

There is no denying that breastfeeding can be emotionally draining, physically exhausting, and mentally taxing. However, it is one of the best things a healthy mother can do for her newborn child. Whenever you’re feeling overwhelmed, remember that you’re doing the best you can for yourself and your baby.
Here are just a few of the benefits of breastfeeding:

– Vital nutrients and antibodies are transferred to the baby during nursing
– Builds strong immunity against common childhood illnesses such as ear infections, asthma, childhood obesity
– Builds immunity against more common illnesses such as colds and the flu
– Lowers the risk of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death) or Crib Death

Benefits of Breastfeeding for You:

– Reduced risk of heart disease, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and type 2 diabetes
– Breastfeeding helps you lose baby weight
– It’s convenient (no waking up to make bottles at 3 a.m.)
– Breastfeeding is free!

Word of advice

It’s always best to speak with your care provider before starting or stopping any routine. The professionals at MidWife 360 can help devise a plan that is right for you, your body, and your baby. Contact us today for more information.