Breech Birth: No Cesarean Needed

breech_birth_no_cesarean

Breech birth is one of the most misunderstood and controversial subjects when it comes to women’s pregnancy and delivery. A breech birth occurs when the baby has its head positioned up instead of down in the uterus. Therefore, coming into the world butt or feet first. Most women will never have the option to decide what they want to do when faced with a breech baby. A planned cesarean section is performed for 94% of all breech babies.

If your provider is an OB, DO, or hospital CNM, you most likely will not be given a choice. Breech births can be successfully carried out without a cesarean. In this blog, we will be discussing the different methods used to deliver these babies without a forced cesarian section. 

How Breech Birth Can Be Fixed Internally 

You may be given the option to try to turn your baby in a procedure called ‘external cephalic version’, or ECV. (This is a procedure where the provider attempts to shift the baby from head up to head down using a deep massage technique.) It can be quite painful, or not, depending on the provider’s technique and how difficult it is.

This procedure is about 74% successful and most people who have a successful ECV will go on to have a vaginal birth. For those whose baby doesn’t turn, the majority (88%) will have a cesarean birth – either by choice or because they are forced as they cannot find a provider willing or able to help them birth their breech baby vaginally.

Most hospital providers have not been trained in physiologic breech birth. Rather, they may have been trained in a procedure called “vaginal breech extraction”. This is where the pregnant person is on their back and the baby is pulled out using various maneuvers and ending with a forceps delivery of the head. This is dangerous and often results in damage to the baby, mother, or both. No wonder most providers are unwilling to provide vaginal birth as an option for clients with a breech baby.

How Breech Birth Can Be Done by Changing Position 

In contrast, there is a technique that uses the gravity of the baby moving naturally through the mother’s pelvis. Called “physiologic upright breech birth”. As the name implies, the client is either standing, kneeling, squatting, or on hands and knees. The baby births itself most of the time. A skilled provider will know if the baby needs any help and when to apply which maneuver.

There have been multiple studies that have found no differences in the long-term outcomes between planned CS or planned VBB. Some studies have found a slightly higher risk for the baby between pVBB and pCS. Although, some studies found no difference. The unknown factor is the skill level of the provider

Why Breech Birth is Usually Solved by a Cesarean 

There is almost no option for having a pVBB in the hospital, in the United States. Many people seek alternative options for the birth of their breech baby. Even though this is not their first choice. Home breech birth has been shown to have poorer short-term neonatal outcomes compared to hospital breech birth. But, we don’t know what really causes these poorer outcomes. Anything from an inexperienced provider, possible congenital anomalies, delays, or miscommunication during transfers are all potentially at fault. It’s very possible that home pVBB outcomes could be significantly improved by improving provider training for breech birth.

By eliminating the option for a hospital birth for pVBB, lawmakers, hospital administrators, and Obstetricians are effectively forcing people to have cesareans. This goes against state and federal rulings that protect a person’s right to refuse surgery, as well as moral and ethical mandates to respect bodily autonomy.

Breech Without Borders 

At Midwife360, Fadwah has been trained in the art of VBB and has attended a handful of pVBB in and out of the hospital setting, as well as several breech births in the hospital during twin births where the second baby is coming breech. She has attended and is working with Breech Without Borders Breech Pro Workshop to add to her skill level and to bring this valuable training to other providers in our community. All birth providers – CPM, CNM, OB, DO – are welcome to attend.

As a birth worker, there is always a risk of a person showing up in advanced labor with a breech baby. Rather than trying to rush into the OR for a cesarean that carries its own set of risks (not only for this birth but for the next birth and baby) why not learn the art of physiologic vaginal breech birth to assist the process safely? Go to midwife360.com to learn more about the upcoming Breech Without Borders workshop.

Midwife360 Turns 7!

Insurance Midwife360 Updates

On April 1st, Midwife360 will be celebrating it’s 7th year of practice. As I sit here savoring my morning cup of herbal tea, enjoying the sunshine and beautiful weather only south Florida springtime can bring, I am remembering the early days – my big ‘why’, the successes and setbacks, the various people who helped (or hurt) along the way and the current state of affairs. 

MIDWIFE360 OVER THE YEARS

I started this practice to offer something different to the women and families of my community. After working in the hospital and OB office for 8 years, I know that many women, especially the millennials, want something different when it comes to the care of their gyn health and pregnancies. And I wanted something different and better for the babies. They don’t have a voice; I am their voice and I am shouting that babies want to come into this world gently, with love and respect.

“We” started out as “I” for years, along with various students that worked with me along the way. Most notably, I was able to help Rosalia Cannava become licensed after 3 long years of apprenticeship. Mandy Rojas (currently owner of Palm Beach Maternity Center) trained with me for a bit. And then in 2018 Lauren Danella, CNM moved to Florida to begin working with me. Last February Lauren left to work with Bliss Birth Center, but came back in November when we were getting so busy. Marlie Honorat started with us in September, and will continue having 2 office days a week. In addition, the people that have helped with keeping all of the details working smoothly have been essential to our success. These include Vanessa Scoz, Sandra Alandete, Kayleigh Taylor and Bruna Possobon. 

CHALLENGE IN BIRTH SERVICES

One of the consistently biggest challenges has been dealing with insurance companies. Like any business that sells services, the key to success is being able to charge appropriately for those services and to get paid for that work. Sometimes when I’m driving around and I see a landscaping truck or construction vehicles with the company logo or even the pool guy, I am envious that those people are providing services and getting paid. The healthcare industry is unique in the world of business in that most providers (if they work with insurance) do not do the work and then get paid. I am constantly shaking my head at the system that we have inherited from the last century. 

HOW INSURANCE WORKS WITH MIDWIFES

In case you didn’t know, here’s how it works. A provider has to go through a lengthy application process to become credentialed with an insurance company. They may have to wait 60-120 days to be approved. And one can be credentialed, but not invited into the network. If they are out of network, some folks with that insurance cannot see them and use their benefits or a request can be filed to have the services covered as if the provider were in network – this is called a GAP exception or single case agreement. This usually only works if the service is something no one else is providing – like home birth with a Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM). And this can be beneficial as the provider is allowed to balance bill the client for the difference between the contracted rate and the actual charges.

That’s another eye-opener. The provider’s charges are not what the insurance company pays. For instance, my charge for self pay full journey for pregnancy care with birth at home is $7000. This covers everything, no hidden fees. The rates that have been offered to me from insurance companies vary from $2300 – $3600 for what is called Global Maternity. AND the provider may not bill for the services until after the birth. So we provide 8-9 months of regular services, but cannot get paid until well after the main event and are lucky to receive half of our normal fees. In addition, some companies require us to apply for authorizations in order to qualify to be paid for certain services – services that are part and parcel of what we do, that they cover, and are part of our contract to be compensated. 

In addition to all of this, the system for filing claims is complicated, CPT (procedure) and ICD10 (diagnosis) codes must be accurate and present, and they only accept electronic claim filing through an electronic data clearinghouse. Therefore, a provider has to turn over a percentage of the already low amount of money they receive to a third party to file the claims and appeal any denials – which happen regularly. I’ve been told that insurance companies deny a percentage of all claims in the hopes that some of them won’t get appealed. It’s all part of the game. These are some of the headaches and drawbacks for the provider when playing the insurance game.

DOWNSIDE FOR PRIVATE INSURANCE PATIENTS

From the client’s point of view it’s just as bad. People get insurance thinking that they will be covered if they get sick or, I don’t know, have a baby. They are paying a monthly premium usually $300-500 per month and are always shocked at the sticker price when we do the breakdown of what their financial responsibility is even with insurance. If they have a deductible, they must pay up to the entire amount before the insurance will cover anything. In addition, if there is co-insurance then once the deductible is met, they will have to pay their percentage of what’s left according to the contracted rate. Then there are things not covered by insurance (birth tub rental, second licensed person at the birth, supplies, home visits) and this fee is added. They are typically paying us an average of $4000 in addition to their monthly premiums. 

Through the years this system has consistently been the limiting factor for Midwife360. I went through 7 different billing scenarios (including doing my own electronic filing for about 14 months until I couldn’t keep up with the appeals process) before settling on the current company that we use. Innovation Billing (thanks guys!) And they are great – really help me feel that they care about our success. However, all of this paper chasing has taken the joy out of the work. The constant need to keep up with figuring out who needs to have an authorization and following up on them. And the length of time that payment can take if there is a denial or any problems with the claim makes it impossible to know what the actual revenue is for any specific period of time. It’s a ‘keep churning out the work, fingers crossed and hope for the best’ situation. 

MIDWIFE360 IS A CONCIERGE PRACTICE

Another consideration – we are a concierge practice. We offer hour long prenatal visits with at least one home visit during the prenatal period. The client has prenatal care with the provider that will attend the birth. We come to the home for the active labor and birth and stay 2-4 hours after, providing immediate postpartum care to the mom and immediate newborn care to the baby. We come to the home twice in the first week of the baby’s life. We draw labs in the office. We can perform some simple ultrasound procedures. Clients who have had standard OB care in our community are familiar with the 5-10 min prenatal visits after waiting an hour in the waiting room, sometimes having to go to the lab for blood draws, getting a provider at the birth they’ve never met, and another stranger to care for the baby. And on top of all that, insurance companies are paying the OB providers more for that level of service than they pay us for the concierge level services we offer.

NO LONGER ACCEPTING INSURANCE

In light of all of the aforementioned issues, Midwife360 is going to discontinue working with insurance companies as of November 1, 2021. We will continue all of our current contracts through October 31, 2021.

We encourage prospective clients to come in for an hour long consultation. We charge $50 for the hour, and apply that to the fees once the client has decided to come in for care with us.

We will do our best to make our services affordable for everyone who decides that they want this level of care for one of the most important days of their lives! 

5 Benefits of a Home Water Birth

Throughout your pregnancy, the one thing that lingers in your mind often is the time of giving birth. There are a variety of birth options available today. Depending on your overall health and preference, you can choose to give birth from home, and a highly recommended method is a water birth.

Did you know today, thousands of women worldwide are choosing home water births? To find out why, keep reading.

What exactly is a home water birth? It is merely a birth that happens at home and is attended by a qualified midwife or doctor. In this case, the baby is born in the water, usually a birth pool. You may choose to labor in the water and get out to deliver, or you could decide to deliver in the water. The concept behind a water birth is that it will be gentler for the baby since it has been in the amniotic sac for nine months.

Are you thinking of having a water birth? Or are you still unsure whether it’s worth it? Let’s dive into some of the benefits of home water births to help you make an informed decision.

Benefits of a home water birth

Water births are becoming more popular each day. Wondering why? According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, water births comes with some incredible benefits, making them a worthwhile pursuit. These benefits include:

Increased relaxation

Most women choose water births because of the relaxation benefits the water gives. How so? The answer lies in the water temperature and motion that helps in relaxation throughout the labor. Contractions usually lose their rhythm if you are tense. Once you are in the warm water, you feel relieved and relaxed, making contractions less stressful and shorter.

Being fully immersed in water also lowers your blood pressure, giving you a more relaxed feeling. Water birth is also less stressful for your baby.

Pain relief

If you want natural birth pain relief, then water birth is your friend. Many women opt to deliver their baby in the water because they won’t need pain relief medication like an epidural. Being in the warm water makes it easier for you to manage your painful contractions.

A higher sense of privacy

A birthing pool and a dimmed room is privacy on another level. Who would not feel relaxed in such a situation? Compared to bright labor wards, the ambiance in your home is significantly more comforting. Your focus is solely on labor with this form of privacy. For some people, quietness is pivotal to keeping them calm.

Increased sense of control

The water’s buoyancy effect lessens your body weight, allowing you to move freely and switch angles until you find a comfortable position. In a nutshell, being in the water makes you safer, secure, and more comfortable.

Reduced chances of episiotomy

An episiotomy is a surgical cut performed to enlarge your vaginal opening while giving birth. To avoid tearing and stitches, water birth comes in handy. It makes the perineum to be more relaxed and elastic. As a result, it reduces the incidences of tearing and enlarging the vaginal opening.

Water births present a gentler welcome to the world for you and your baby. Delivering in a birth pool comes with tons of benefits that make it a worthwhile option to consider. Benefits range from reduced labor pain and increased relaxation, to the privilege of giving birth surrounded by your loved ones.

Contact us today for more information about home water births.

Midwife360 Partners with Care Credit

Care Credit for Maternity Services Palm Beach

Introducing Care Credit at Midwife360!

Having a natural birth at home is becoming more and more appealing as the COVID numbers grow and healthy pregnant people begin to question the automatic choice to give birth in the hospital.

However, home birth is not always covered 100% by insurance (think deductible and co-insurance) and even with Medicaid, there are some out of pocket expenses that Medicaid does not cover. With Midwife360, the lowest out of pocket amount is currently $1200 and many folks with private insurance may have to pay around $5000 when the numbers are crunched for their particular benefit plan. Our self pay rate is $6700. While even that is a small price to pay for one of the most beautiful and memorable days of your life, not everyone has that kind of cash available or even that much credit.

Enter Care Credit. Care Credit is easy to apply for and most people are approved and the staff at Midwife360 will help. It allows for a 4th option (other than cash, debit, or traditional credit card) to pay for your care without breaking the bank. Depending on the program chosen, there is an option for 6 or 12 months credit with no interest, or a low interest 24 month credit card.

Midwife360 pays a small percentage and we get paid for our services while the client gets to pay over more time for no extra cost (when choosing the no interest option).

We are happy to be able to help our clients be able to pay for their care without causing undue financial stress. Contact us today to find out more!

Top Ways to Prepare for a Positive Birth Experience

The top ways to prepare for a positive labor and birth experience begin long before the actual labor starts. At Midwife360, we talk about our “Recipe for Success” when we are discussing a client’s birth plans. 

The core of our recommendations include self-education through reading books and online resources (see the reading and web organization list at the end of this article) and commitment to a healthy lifestyle through clean eating and regular exercise. We strongly advise eliminating processed foods, dairy, and inorganic foods. Through clean eating and regular exercise, it is likely that there will be an absence of disease processes such as diabetes and high blood pressure which can make a pregnancy cross the line into a truly high-risk status. If the pregnancy can be maintained in the low-risk status range, then recommendations such as induction of labor are more easily declined. 

Our “Recipe for Success”

Our “Recipe for Success” also includes hiring a doula and taking a deep meditation for labor course such as Blissborn or Hypnobabies. Many times the doula will be the one who teaches these courses. Doulas are invaluable as educational resources and typically have a wealth of information regarding comfort measures and labor preparation activities. They will meet with the client usually two times prenatally and will be the first to show up at the labor. They help with labor support if things are not progressing, and will let you know when to call the midwife or leave for the hospital. Meditation or hypnosis is a tool that can be used to cope with the surges of labor. It helps to keep the mind occupied with positive thoughts to allow the body to perform the work of releasing the baby unimpeded.

Positioning of the Baby 

The most common reason that labor doesn’t progress is the positioning of the baby. We recommend becoming familiar with an online resource called “Spinning Babies” that teaches postures that can be used prenatally to help ensure proper positioning of the baby in relation to the mother’s bony pelvis. This will ease the baby’s passage and create a more efficient labor process. Your doula will most likely be familiar with this resource and have the ability to guide you through the postures as well as know when to employ them in labor.

Using a Birth Tub 

The final recommendation in our “Recipe for Success” is to use a birth tub for labor and birth. The benefits of hydrotherapy have been recognized by midwives and laboring women for years. Some people call it a ‘liquid epidural’ as the sense of relief is so great when entering a warm tub of water in active labor. Sitting on a yoga ball or stool in the shower can have some of the same sense of relief, but immersion in water is better and helps lift the belly to remove the heaviness caused by gravity. Also, releasing the baby into the water helps with vaginal and perineal stretching and reduces tearing.

Visiting a Chiropractor and Acupuncturist 

In addition to the “Recipe”, we strongly recommend developing relationships with a chiropractor and acupuncturist who are skilled in caring for pregnant people. Get regular massages and take yoga classes or do yoga at home. All of these adjunctive therapies contribute to a body that is well adjusted and free from muscular and energetic blockages that can inhibit the passage of the baby when it’s time for birth. 

Preparing for a positive labor and birth experience ideally starts before pregnancy. However, with a determined mindset and a willingness to do the work, preparation for a positive experience can easily be accomplished in the 40 weeks of pregnancy. Decide where you want to give birth and hire a care provider that you trust. Check out the resources listed below and prepare to have an amazing, informed, respectful labor and birth experience!

High-tech Childbirth is Not Always Better

Baby girl few minutes after the birth

America excels in high-tech medicine

When it comes to healthcare and medicine, America is the greatest country in the world. If you get into a car crash or have a heart attack, or need a life-saving surgery, then you are very grateful to have that happen in the US of A. However, this statement is not true if you are pregnant and healthy. It is well known that the US scores shamefully low on the two standards used worldwide to evaluate how well a country is doing in the area of childbirth – infant mortality and maternal mortality. And it’s not a mystery as to why this is the case. We know that the standard interventions performed on pregnant women in the hospital on low-risk, healthy moms and babies are not evidence based. Withholding food and fluids by mouth.  Limiting movement and positioning in labor.  Use of continuous fetal monitoring for low risk labors.  Non-medically indicated inductions.  Immediate cord clamping.  Overuse of Pitocin for labor augmentation. All of these standard interventions can lead to perceived and real problems that trigger the cascade of events leading to an operative delivery – forceps, vacuum extraction, or cesarean (and occasionally a cesarean with forceps or vacuum delivery!).

Low-tech better for physiologic childbirth

When it comes to childbirth, high tech is not better than low tech. I have been privileged to attend many out of hospital births and many more in hospital births. Even a ‘normal’ birth in the hospital typically comes with continuous fetal monitoring and epidural. And unless it is the middle of the night and the lights are kept dimmed, the nurses use intermittent monitoring, the cord is left alone for at least 10-15 minutes, and the baby is kept on the mother AT ALL TIMES, no hospital birth worker has truly witnessed natural birth. There are many, many videos of home birth on the internet and it can be seen time and again the beauty and wonder of birth as it is meant to be.

Out-of-hospital birth should be first-line care for all low-risk childbirth

We have such great prenatal care standards, that any significant problem with the mom or the baby will most likely be detected prior to labor so that a baby that may need more high tech assistance can be born in a place where she can receive that assistance in a timely manner. It is so unlikely that a healthy mom and baby will have a major life-threatening problem during the birth process, that out of hospital birth and midwifery have been approved through legislation in most states. And statistics have proven that most transports from an out of hospital setting are done for non-emergent reasons. The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists have suggested that the out of hospital Birth Center should be the first level of care for healthy pregnant women. They recommend only moving up the chain to a hospital capable of performing a cesarean if there are risk criteria that have been demonstrated.

Low-tech interventions for childbirth

So that means in order to fix the problem, more doctors need to be trained in the low tech hand skills that are truly helpful to laboring women. These include Leopolds maneuvers (feeling the baby from the outside to determine it’s position), which, when performed properly, can assist the provider to be able to tell not only the baby’s position but if there is adequate fluid around the baby. Keeping hands out of the way other than to provide warm compresses during the actual birth. Turning a breech baby to avoid a breech delivery. Even being able to perform a breech delivery – these are skills that are slowly being lost to us because they are not being taught in medical schools. And delayed cord clamping is probably the single most important non-intervention that can be supported at a birth! We have been complacent, and have allowed an intervention – immediate clamping and cutting of the umbilical cord (that typically happens in the course of surgical birth) – to become standard of care for all births without studying the effects. It is part of the OB culture and doctors and CNMs are taught to do it without question. This is what happens when you put surgeons in charge of a physiological event.

Women’s complacency has really been the main cause of our loss of control over our bodies and our labors. It is time for us to stand up and reclaim our bodies, our labors, and our births. Support your local midwife, demand respect and evidence based care. Maintain a healthy lifestyle and prepare yourself for an out of hospital birth – it will transform your life!

 

Creating Value in Childbirth

young pregnant woman

Costs of Care Creating Value Challenge

In 2007, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) proposed a framework for optimizing health system performance known as the “triple aim”. The three components are:

  • Improve the experience of care
  • Improve the health of populations
  • Reduce the per capita costs of healthcare

At Midwife360 we hit the bullseye on all three! Now, where is that friendly OB who wants to play with us?

It’s time to apply the IHI triple aim to childbirth!

It is well known that the American childbirth culture is very expensive with very poor performance AND little of what happens to birthing people in hospitals is evidence-based.

Childbirth for low-risk healthy women (who comprise the majority of people giving birth) benefits from less, rather than more technology. It is, after all, the only physiologic human function that has been relegated to hospital care. Achieving good outcomes usually goes hand in hand with a positive experience of care and this can be done in a very low-tech, inexpensive way by creating teams of home birth midwives and OBs.

Comfort is key

ACOG approves of home birth under certain conditions – choosing the appropriate client, with a CNM, in an integrated environment. As giving birth is much like making love, it is easier to imagine this happening in an environment where the birthing person feels the most comfortable – whether that be her home, a birthing center, or a hospital. So creating a culture that truly supports choice for birthing people without removing the option of access to a higher level of care can be accomplished by having a care team of a homebirth midwife and OB with hospital privileges.

Recreating home

Short of that, making hospital labor rooms more homelike – dimmers on the main lights, several options for water immersion (large shower, birthing tubs), small refrigerators in the room, and a second bed for family members or the doula to use – and updating care to reflect the evidence and patient preference are all absolutely necessary to achieve the IHI triple aim.